JMIR Cancer

Patient-centered innovations, education, and technology for cancer care, cancer survivorship, and cancer research

Editor-in-Chief:

‪Deborah Vollmer Dahlke, DrPH‬


JMIR Cancer (JC) is a Pubmed- and ESCI-indexed, peer-reviewed journal with a focus on education, innovation and technology in cancer care, cancer survivorship and cancer research, as well as in participatory and patient-centred approaches. This journal also includes research on non-Internet approaches to improve cancer care and cancer research.

We invite submissions of original research, viewpoints, reviews, tutorials, case studies, and non-conventional articles (e.g. open patient education material and software resources that are not yet evaluated but free for others to use/implement). 

In our "Patients' Corner", we invite patients and survivors to submit short essays and viewpoints on all aspects of cancer, but in particular suggestions on how to improve the health care system, and suggestions for new technologies, applications and approaches (this section has no article processing fees).

JC is open access and all articles are published under a Creative Commons Attribution license. JC has been accepted for indexing in PubMed Central and PubMed, Scopus, and the Emerging Sources Citation Index (Clarivate).

In case of acceptance, an Article Processing Fee will be charged to cover copyediting and typesetting costs (see fee schedule).

Recent Articles

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Mobile Apps for Cancer Care and Cancer Prevention and Screening

The-Optimal-Lymph-Flow (TOLF) is a patient-centered, web- and mobile-based mHealth system that delivers safe, easy, and feasible digital therapy of lymphatic exercises and limb mobility exercises.

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Patient Education for Cancer

Patients with cancer and survivors may experience the fear of cancer recurrence (FCR), a preoccupation with the progression or recurrence of cancer. During the spread of COVID-19 in 2019, patients and survivors experienced increased levels of FCR. Hence, there is a greater need to identify effective evidence-based treatments to help people cope with FCR. Remotely delivered interventions might provide a valuable means to address FCR in patients with cancer.

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Nutrition, Physical Activity, Healthy Lifestyle for Cancer Patients and Survivors

We conducted a pilot 2-arm randomized controlled trial to assess the feasibility of a digital health intervention to increase moderate-to-vigorous physical activity in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) during chemotherapy.

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Cancer Survivorship

Colorectal cancer survivors face multiple challenges after discharge. eHealth may potentially support them by providing tools such as smartphone apps. They have lots of capabilities to exchange information and could be used for remote monitoring of these patients.

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Nutrition, Physical Activity, Healthy Lifestyle for Cancer Patients and Survivors

Access to exercise for cancer survivors is poor despite global recognition of its benefits. Telerehabilitation may overcome barriers to exercise for cancer survivors but is not routinely offered.

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Viewpoints on Innovations in Cancer Care and Research

Cutaneous melanoma has always been a dreaded diagnosis because of its high mortality rate and its proclivity for invasiveness and metastasis. Historically, advanced melanoma treatment has been limited to chemotherapy and nonspecific immunotherapy agents that display poor curative potential and high toxicity. However, during the last decade, the evolving understanding of the mutational burden of melanoma and immune system evasion mechanisms has led to the development of targeted therapy and specific immunotherapy agents that have transformed the landscape of advanced melanoma treatment. Despite the considerable strides in understanding the clinical implications of these agents, there is a scarcity of randomized clinical trials that directly compare the efficacy of the aforementioned agents; hence, there are no clear preferences among the available first-line options. In addition, the introduction of these agents was associated with a variety of dermatologic adverse events, some of which have shown a detrimental effect on the continuity of treatment. This holds especially true in light of the current fragmentation of care provided by the managing health care professionals. In this study, we attempt to summarize the current understanding of first-line treatments. In addition, the paper describes the indirect comparative evidence that aids in bridging the gap in the literature. Furthermore, this paper sheds light on the impact of the scarcity of dermatology specialist input in the management of dermatologic adverse events associated with advanced melanoma treatment. It also looks into the potential avenues where dermatologic input can bridge the gap in the care provided by oncologists, thus standardizing the care provided to patients with melanoma presenting with dermatologic adverse events.

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Reviews on Innovations in Cancer

Chatbot is a timely topic applied in various fields, including medicine and health care, for human-like knowledge transfer and communication. Machine learning, a subset of artificial intelligence, has been proven particularly applicable in health care, with the ability for complex dialog management and conversational flexibility.

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Nutrition, Physical Activity, Healthy Lifestyle for Cancer Patients and Survivors

The number of older patients with gastrointestinal cancer is increasing due to an aging global population. Minimizing reliance on an in-clinic patient performance status test to determine a patient’s prognosis and course of treatment can improve resource utilization. Further, current performance status measurements cannot capture patients' constant changes. These measurements also rely on self-reports, which are subjective and subject to bias. Real-time monitoring of patients' activities may allow for a more accurate assessment of patients’ performance status while minimizing resource utilization.

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Innovations and Technology in Cancer Care

With the current proliferation of clinical information technologies internationally, patient portals are increasingly being adopted in health care. Research, conducted mostly in the United States, shows that oncology patients have a keen interest in portals to gain access to and track comprehensive personal health information. In Canada, patient portals are relatively new and research into their use and effects is currently emerging. There is a need to understand oncology patients’ experiences of using eHealth tools and to ground these experiences in local sociopolitical contexts of technology implementation, while seeking to devise strategies to enhance portal benefits.

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Patient Education for Cancer

Modification is an important process by which to adapt an instrument to be used for another culture. However, it is not fully understood how best to modify an instrument to be used appropriately in another culture.

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Breast Cancer

In China, the internet has become one of the most important ways to obtain information about breast cancer. However, quantitative evaluations of the quality of Chinese health websites and the breast cancer treatment information they publish are lacking.

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