JMIR Cancer

Patient-centered innovations, education, and technology for cancer care, cancer survivorship, and cancer research

Editor-in-Chief:

‪Deborah Vollmer Dahlke, DrPH‬


Impact Factor 2023

JMIR Cancer is a peer-reviewed journal focusing on education, innovation and technology in cancer care, cancer survivorship and cancer research, and participatory and patient-centred approaches. This journal also includes research on non-Internet approaches to improve cancer care and cancer research.

We invite submissions of original research, viewpoints, reviews, tutorials, case studies, and non-conventional articles (e.g. open patient education material and software resources that are not yet evaluated but are free for others to use/implement). 

In our "Patients' Corner," we invite patients and survivors to submit short essays and viewpoints on all aspects of cancer. In particular, we are interested in suggestions on improving the health care system and suggestions for new technologies, applications and approaches (this section has no article processing fees).

JMIR Cancer is open access, and all articles are published under a Creative Commons Attribution license. JMIR Cancer is indexed in PubMed Central and PubMedScopusDOAJ and the Emerging Sources Citation Index (Clarivate).

Recent Articles

Article Thumbnail
Teleoncology

The COVID-19 pandemic necessitated a rapid shift to telemedicine to minimize patient and provider exposure risks. While telemedicine has been used in a variety of primary and specialty care settings for many years, it has been slow to be adopted in oncology care. Health care provider and administrator perspectives on factors affecting telemedicine use in oncology settings are not well understood, and the conditions associated with the COVID-19 pandemic offered the opportunity to study the adoption of telemedicine and the resulting provider and staff perspectives on its use.

|
Article Thumbnail
Cancer Survivorship

There are currently an estimated 1.5 million individuals living in the United States with colorectal cancer (CRC), and although the 5-year survival rate has increased, survivors are at risk for recurrence, particularly within the first 2-3 years after treatment. National guidelines recommend continued surveillance after resection to identify recurrence early on. Adherence among survivors ranges from 23% to 94%. Novel interventions are needed to increase CRC survivors’ knowledge and confidence in managing their cancer and thus to increase adherence to follow-up surveillance.

|
Article Thumbnail
Innovations and Technology in Cancer Care

Distressing cancer pain remains a serious symptom management issue for patients and family caregivers, particularly within home settings. Technology can support home-based cancer symptom management but must consider the experience of patients and family caregivers, as well as the broader environmental context.

|
Article Thumbnail
Innovations and Technology in Cancer Care

Patient-centered communication (PCC) plays a vital role in effective cancer management and care. Patient portals are increasingly available to patients and hold potential as a valuable tool to facilitate PCC. However, whether more frequent use of patient portals is associated with increased perceived PCC and which mechanisms might mediate this relationship have not been fully studied.

|
Article Thumbnail
Emotional, Social, Psychological Support for Cancer

Psychosocial eHealth interventions for people with cancer are promising in reducing distress; however, their results in terms of effects and adherence rates are quite mixed. Developing interventions with a solid evidence base while still ensuring adaptation to user wishes and needs is recommended to overcome this. As most models of eHealth development are based primarily on examining user experiences (so-called bottom-up requirements), it is not clear how theory and evidence (so-called top-down requirements) may best be integrated into the development process.

|
Article Thumbnail
Emotional, Social, Psychological Support for Cancer

The negative psychosocial impacts of cancer diagnoses and treatments are well documented. Virtual care has become an essential mode of care delivery during the COVID-19 pandemic, and online support groups (OSGs) have been shown to improve accessibility to psychosocial and supportive care. de Souza Institute offers CancerChatCanada, a therapist-led OSG service where sessions are monitored by an artificial intelligence–based co-facilitator (AICF). The AICF is equipped with a recommender system that uses natural language processing to tailor online resources to patients according to their psychosocial needs.

|
Article Thumbnail
Innovations and Technology in Cancer Care

Connection with nature has well-established physical and psychological benefits. However, women with metastatic breast cancer (MBC) are often unable to access nature because of physical limitations, psychological barriers, and treatment demands. Virtual reality (VR) nature experiences offer an alternative means of connecting with nature and may be of particular benefit to patients with cancer who are house- or hospital-bound.

|
Article Thumbnail
Innovations and Technology in Cancer Care

A cancer diagnosis is a source of psychological and emotional stress, which are often maintained for sustained periods of time that may lead to depressive disorders. Depression is one of the most common psychological conditions in patients with cancer. According to the Global Cancer Observatory, breast and colorectal cancers are the most prevalent cancers in both sexes and across all age groups in Spain.

|
Article Thumbnail
Reviews on Innovations in Cancer

Despite high levels of psychological distress experienced by many patients with cancer, previous research has identified several barriers to accessing traditional face-to-face psychological support. Web-based psychosocial interventions have emerged as a promising alternative.

|
Article Thumbnail
Reviews on Innovations in Cancer

Breast cancer has positioned itself worldwide as one of the main public health problems, especially in Latin America. In some countries, several programs for the prevention and control of breast cancer in women have been developed and implemented on a permanent basis, but there are no public reports on the policies that originated such programs.

|
Article Thumbnail
Supporting Partners and Informal Caregiver of Cancer Patients

Adult child caregivers of parents with cancer may face challenges when communicating with the patient and other family members, communicating during clinical interactions, and navigating web-based information seeking.

|

Preprints Open for Peer-Review

There are no preprints available for open peer-review at this time. Please check back later.

We are working in partnership with