JMIR Cancer

Patient-centered innovations, education, and technology for cancer care, cancer survivorship, and cancer research.

Editor-in-Chief:

Taiane de Azevedo Cardoso, BSc, MSc, PhD, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Editor at JMIR Publications, Canada; Affiliate Senior Lecturer, School of Medicine, Deakin University, Australia


Impact Factor 2.8

JMIR Cancer (JC, ISSN: 2369-1999, Impact Factor: 2.8) is a peer-reviewed journal focusing on education, innovation and technology in cancer care, cancer survivorship and cancer research, and participatory and patient-centred approaches. This journal also includes research on non-Internet approaches to improve cancer care and cancer research.

We invite submissions of original research, viewpoints, reviews, tutorials, case studies, and non-conventional articles (e.g. open patient education material and software resources that are not yet evaluated but are free for others to use/implement). 

In our "Patients' Corner," we invite patients and survivors to submit short essays and viewpoints on all aspects of cancer. In particular, we are interested in suggestions on improving the health care system and suggestions for new technologies, applications and approaches (this section has no article processing fees).

In 2023, JMIR Cancer received an inaugural Journal Impact Factor™ of 2.8 (Source: Journal Citation Reports™ from Clarivate, 2023). JMIR Cancer is indexed in PubMed Central and PubMedScopusDOAJ and the Emerging Sources Citation Index (Clarivate).

Recent Articles

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Viewpoints and Perspectives

This viewpoint paper considers the authors’ perspectives on the potential role of smartphones, wearables, and other technologies in the diagnosis of cancer. We believe that these technologies could be valuable additions in the pursuit of early cancer diagnosis, as they offer solutions to the timely detection of signals or symptoms and monitoring of subtle changes in behavior that may otherwise be missed. In addition to signal detection, technologies could assist symptom interpretation and guide and facilitate access to health care. This paper aims to provide an overview of the scientific rationale as to why these technologies could be valuable for early cancer detection, as well as outline the next steps for research and development to drive investigation into the potential for smartphones and wearables in this context and optimize implementation. We draw attention to potential barriers to successful implementation, including the difficulty of the development of signals and sensors with sufficient utility and accuracy through robust research with the target group. There are regulatory challenges; the potential for innovations to exacerbate inequalities; and questions surrounding acceptability, uptake, and correct use by the intended target group and health care practitioners. Finally, there is potential for unintended consequences on individuals and health care services including unnecessary anxiety, increased symptom burden, overinvestigation, and inappropriate use of health care resources.

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Emotional, Social, Psychological Support for Cancer

Breast cancer affects the lives of not only those diagnosed but also the people around them. Many of those affected share their experiences on social media. However, these narratives may differ according to who the poster is and what their relationship with the patient is; a patient posting about their experiences may post different content from someone whose friends or family has breast cancer. Weibo is 1 of the most popular social media platforms in China, and breast cancer–related posts are frequently found there.

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Cancer Epidemiology, Cancer Surveillance and Infodemiology

Mis- and disinformation on social media have become widespread, which can lead to a lack of trust in health information sources and, in turn, lead to negative health outcomes. Moreover, the effect of mis- and disinformation on trust in information sources may vary by racial and ethnic minoritized populations.

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Cancer and Prevention in the Media

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Twitter (recently rebranded as “X”) was the most widely used social media platform with over 2 million cancer-related tweets. The increasing use of social media among patients and family members, providers, and organizations has allowed for novel methods of studying cancer communication.

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Doctor-Patient Communication on Cancer, Prevention, and Screening

A substantial percentage of the US population is not up to date on guideline-recommended cancer screenings. Identifying interventions that effectively improve screening rates would enhance the delivery of such screening. Interventions involving health IT (HIT) show promise, but much remains unknown about how HIT is optimized to support cancer screening in primary care.

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Emotional, Social, Psychological Support for Cancer

Make It Training is an e–mental health intervention designed for individuals with cancer that aims to reduce psychological distress and improve disease-related coping and quality of life.

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Breast Cancer

Trastuzumab has had a major impact on the treatment of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive breast cancer (BC). Anti-HER2 biosimilars such as Ogivri have demonstrated safety and clinical equivalence to trastuzumab (using Herceptin as the reference product) in clinical trials. To our knowledge, there has been no real-world report of the side effects and quality of life (QoL) in patients treated with biosimilars using electronic patient-reported outcomes (ePROs).

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Innovations and Technology in Cancer Care

Medication nonadherence negatively impacts the health outcomes of people with cancer as well as health care costs. Digital technologies present opportunities to address this health issue. However, there is limited evidence on how to develop digital interventions that meet the needs of people with cancer, are perceived as useful, and are potentially effective in improving medication adherence.

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Emotional, Social, Psychological Support for Cancer

Adolescents and young adults (AYAs) diagnosed with cancer experience physical, cognitive, and psychosocial effects from cancer treatment that can negatively affect their ability to remain engaged in education or work through cancer treatment and in the long term. Disengagement from education or work can have lasting implications for AYAs’ financial independence, psychosocial well-being, and quality of life. Australian AYAs with cancer lack access to adequate specialist support for their education and work needs and report a preference for web-based support that they can access from anywhere, in their own time. However, it remains unclear what web-based resources exist that are tailored to support AYAs with cancer in reaching their educational or work goals.

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Reviews on Innovations in Cancer

People with cancer frequently experience severe and distressing symptoms associated with cancer and its treatments. Predicting symptoms in patients with cancer continues to be a significant challenge for both clinicians and researchers. The rapid evolution of machine learning (ML) highlights the need for a current systematic review to improve cancer symptom prediction.

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Viewpoints on Innovations in Cancer Care and Research

Cancer prevalence data for Black Americans is monolithic and fails to consider the diverse cultures and backgrounds within that community. For instance, African immigrants constitute a meaningful proportion of the foreign-born Black immigrants in the United States (42%), but the prevalence of cancer in the African immigrant community itself is unknown. Therefore, without accurate cancer prevalence data, it is impossible to identify trends and other key factors that are needed to support the health of African immigrants and their children. Moreover, it is impossible to understand how the culture and language of subgroups influence their cancer-related health behavior. While research in this area is limited, the existing literature articulates the need for culturally responsive and culturally tailored cancer education for African immigrants and their adolescent children, which is what we advocate for in this viewpoint paper. Existing projects demonstrate the feasibility of culturally responsive programming for adults; however, few projects include or focus on adolescents or children born to African immigrants. To best meet the needs of this understudied community, researchers must use culturally competent interventions alongside familiar, usable media. For adolescents, technology is ubiquitous thus, the creation of a culturally tailored digital intervention has immense potential to improve cancer awareness and prevention for youth and their community. More research is needed to address many of the existing research gaps and develop a rich understanding of the unique experience of cancer among African immigrant families that can be used to inform intervention development. Through this viewpoint, we review the current state of cancer-related research among African immigrant families in the United States. In this paper, we acknowledge the current knowledge gaps and issues surrounding measurement and then discuss the factors relevant to designing an educational intervention targeted at African immigrants and the role of African immigrant youth.

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Innovations and Technology in Cancer Care

Frequent sensor-assisted monitoring of changes in swallowing function may help improve detection of radiation-associated dysphagia before it becomes permanent. While our group has prototyped an epidermal strain/surface electromyography sensor that can detect minute changes in swallowing muscle movement, it is unknown whether patients with head and neck cancer would be willing to wear such a device at home after radiation for several months.

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