JMIR Cancer

Patient-centered innovations, education, and technology for cancer care, cancer survivorship, and cancer research.

Editor-in-Chief:

Naomi Cahill, PhD, RD, Editor-in-Chief; Scientific Editor at JMIR Publications, Canada


Impact Factor 3.3 CiteScore 4.1

JMIR Cancer (JC, ISSN: 2369-1999) is a peer-reviewed journal focusing on education, innovation and technology in cancer care, cancer survivorship and cancer research, and participatory and patient-centred approaches. This journal also includes research on non-Internet approaches to improve cancer care and cancer research.

We invite submissions of original research, viewpoints, reviews, tutorials, case studies, and non-conventional articles (e.g. open patient education material and software resources that are not yet evaluated but are free for others to use/implement). 

In our "Patients' Corner," we invite patients and survivors to submit short essays and viewpoints on all aspects of cancer. In particular, we are interested in suggestions on improving the health care system and suggestions for new technologies, applications and approaches (this section has no article processing fees).

In 2024, JMIR Cancer received a Journal Impact Factor™ of 3.3 (Source: Journal Citation Reports™ from Clarivate, 2024). JMIR Cancer is indexed in PubMed Central and PubMedScopusDOAJ and the Emerging Sources Citation Index (Clarivate). With a CiteScore of 4.1, JMIR Cancer is a Q2 journal in the field of Oncology, according to Scopus data.

Recent Articles

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Colon and Rectal Cancer

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is estimated to be the fourth most common cancer diagnosis in Canada (except for nonmelanoma skin cancers) and the second and third leading cause of cancer-related death in male and female individuals, respectively.

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Innovations and Technology in Cancer Care

Using an iterative user-centered design process, our team developed a patient-centered adaptive supportive care system, PatientCareAnywhere, that provides comprehensive biopsychosocial screening and supportive cancer care to patients across the continuum of care adaptively. The overarching goal of PatientCareAnywhere is to improve health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and self-efficacy of patients with cancer by empowering them with self-management skills and bringing cancer care support directly to them at home. Such support is adaptive to the patient’s needs and health status and coordinated across multiple sources in the forms of referrals, education, engagement of community resources, and secure social communication.

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Nutrition, Physical Activity, Healthy Lifestyle for Cancer Patients and Survivors

Recent studies have shown positive, though small, clinical effects of digital smoking cessation (SC) interventions for cancer survivors. However, research on associations among participant characteristics, intervention engagement, and outcomes is limited.

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Cancer Survivorship

Exercise intensity (eg, target heart rate [HR]) is a fundamental component of exercise prescription to elicit health benefits in cancer survivors. Despite the validity of chest-worn monitors, their feasibility in community and unsupervised exercise settings may be challenging. As wearable technology continues to improve, consumer-based wearable sensors may represent an accessible alternative to traditional monitoring, offering additional advantages.

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Innovations and Technology in Cancer Care

Telehealth has emerged as a popular channel for providing outpatient services in many countries. However, the majority of telehealth systems focus on operational functions and offer only a sectional patient journey at most. Experiences with incorporating longitudinal real-world medical record data into telehealth are valuable but have not been widely shared. The feasibility and usability of such a telehealth platform, with comprehensive, real-world data via a live feed, for cancer patient care are yet to be studied.

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Emotional, Social, Psychological Support for Cancer

Mobile health (mHealth) apps offer unique opportunities to support self-care and behavior change, but poor user engagement limits their effectiveness. This is particularly true for fully automated mHealth apps without any human support. Human support in mHealth apps is associated with better engagement but at the cost of reduced scalability.

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Emotional, Social, Psychological Support for Cancer

WeChat (Tencent) is one of the most important information sources for Chinese people. Relevantly, various health-related data are constantly transmitted among WeChat users. WeChat public accounts (WPAs) for health are rapidly emerging. Health-related WeChat public accounts have a significant impact on public health. Because of the rise in web-based health-seeking behavior, the general public has grown accustomed to obtaining cancer information from WPAs. Although WPAs make it easy for people to obtain health information, the quality of the information is questionable.

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Viewpoints on Innovations in Cancer Care and Research

Given that cancer is a challenging disease that plagues millions of individuals of all age groups and socioeconomic statuses globally, developmentally appropriate education is often lacking for young people, particularly adolescents. Increasing cancer awareness and prevention education among adolescents using innovative strategies, such as game-based learning, is critical in reducing the burden of this disease. Adolescents are understudied in the field of cancer prevention and control, yet vulnerable as they tackle creating life-long health behavior patterns. Targeting cancer prevention education for adolescents has the potential to support long-term healthy behavior and reduce their risk of cancer. This paper provides an overview of the Collaborative Research on MEdication use and family health (CRoME) Lab’s novel game-based cancer prevention education tool. OutSMART Cancer is an innovative, novel educational intervention in the form of a serious game. Serious games are educational tools that seek to impart knowledge and improve behaviors in their players. This game covers information related to breast cancer, colon cancer, and lung cancer. This viewpoint is a summary of the developmental process for the OutSMART Cancer game. We describe in detail the work preceding initial game development, the current version of the game, future directions for the game, and its educational potential. The long-term goal of OutSMART Cancer is to improve cancer awareness and knowledge regarding prevention behaviors in adolescents and support a lifetime of health and wellness.

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Viewpoints and Perspectives

This viewpoint paper considers the authors’ perspectives on the potential role of smartphones, wearables, and other technologies in the diagnosis of cancer. We believe that these technologies could be valuable additions in the pursuit of early cancer diagnosis, as they offer solutions to the timely detection of signals or symptoms and monitoring of subtle changes in behavior that may otherwise be missed. In addition to signal detection, technologies could assist symptom interpretation and guide and facilitate access to health care. This paper aims to provide an overview of the scientific rationale as to why these technologies could be valuable for early cancer detection, as well as outline the next steps for research and development to drive investigation into the potential for smartphones and wearables in this context and optimize implementation. We draw attention to potential barriers to successful implementation, including the difficulty of the development of signals and sensors with sufficient utility and accuracy through robust research with the target group. There are regulatory challenges; the potential for innovations to exacerbate inequalities; and questions surrounding acceptability, uptake, and correct use by the intended target group and health care practitioners. Finally, there is potential for unintended consequences on individuals and health care services including unnecessary anxiety, increased symptom burden, overinvestigation, and inappropriate use of health care resources.

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Emotional, Social, Psychological Support for Cancer

Breast cancer affects the lives of not only those diagnosed but also the people around them. Many of those affected share their experiences on social media. However, these narratives may differ according to who the poster is and what their relationship with the patient is; a patient posting about their experiences may post different content from someone whose friends or family has breast cancer. Weibo is 1 of the most popular social media platforms in China, and breast cancer–related posts are frequently found there.

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